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Thread: Advanced Nutrient Control Techniques

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by mgarrido View Post
    ... the calcium levels are 550-600ppm, my ph is 8.1 btw and the corals looks happy
    I was under the impression that if your magnesium and alk are in line, then it is not good to have calcium over 500. long term levels causes stress to corals and leaves deposits on pumps.

    A balanced system can't digest calcium levels over 500 easily and causes problems. Right, wrong, enlighten me.

  2. #22
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    calcium can be over 500 in a healthy system. The problem with having elevated calcium is it limits the amount of Alkalinity you can put into the tank. This causes people to dose more alkalinity, causing precipitant on pumps and deposits at the bottom of the sump. This is only really a problem when calc is over 550-600

    for example these salt water mixes have over 500ppm Calc mixed at 1.0264
    Coralife
    Kent
    Oceanic
    Seachem Marine salt
    Seachem Reef salt

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by soymilk View Post
    calcium can be over 500 in a healthy system. The problem with having elevated calcium is it limits the amount of Alkalinity you can put into the tank. This causes people to dose more alkalinity, causing precipitant on pumps and deposits at the bottom of the sump. This is only really a problem when calc is over 550-600

    So I'm confused where the happy medium is... If your calcium is at 550, your system is not balanced, causing you to add alkalinity, which in turn causes precipitant bringing the calcium back down to acceptable levels...or balanced.




    Quote Originally Posted by soymilk View Post
    ...for example these salt water mixes have over 500ppm Calc mixed at 1.0264
    Coralife
    Kent
    Oceanic
    Seachem Marine salt
    Seachem Reef salt
    I understand your new salt mix will be over 500. In theory, you are only changing out 20%. If your initial calcium read 425 and you are trying to get to 450, you will need about 500 only changing out 20 % of the water.



    From my understanding any thing over 500 is pushing the limits. Get over 600 and you get a cloud as it precipitates (if other parameters are in check).

  4. #24
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    550 is not that bad. I take it back.. calc would have to be over 600 to really be considered a problem. The extra calc will actually limit how much carbonate can stay in solution in your tank. So when it gets to a certain point it was precipitate on its on as carbonate. Yes some will bond with calcium to form calcium carbonate, but ultimately it would be easier to keep both in check if your calc was around or below 500. ( Mines at 400ppm... last time I checked 2 months ago lol )

    As for the salt mix, i was just trying to prove over 500 isn't necessarily bad. Not great, but not bad.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by soymilk View Post
    550 is not that bad. I take it back.. calc would have to be over 600 to really be considered a problem. The extra calc will actually limit how much carbonate can stay in solution in your tank. So when it gets to a certain point it was precipitate on its on as carbonate. Yes some will bond with calcium to form calcium carbonate, but ultimately it would be easier to keep both in check if your calc was around or below 500. ( Mines at 400ppm... last time I checked 2 months ago lol )....
    thanks for clearing that up for me.

  6. #26
    soymilk's Avatar
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    back in the day people used to run jacked up numbers

    550ppm calc, 16dKH alc..... my main tank follows more of a natural seawater levels. 7dKH alk, 380-400 ppm calc, magnesium 1200ppm.

    my frag tank on the other hand..... calc is over 500, alk is 9-10dKH, and i havent even measured magnesium. Almost seems like the higher numbers in this tank helps certain sps grow. Montis were doing awesome in the frag tank. easier to maintain as well..... not having to do the crazy balancing of trying to keep it right at 7. Frag tank was.... dose whatever.... its ok.

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